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CCLA Server Chess

 
Copyright  © 2005– by CCLA.
All rights reserved.
 
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CCLA

Rating System

Explained

CCLA players do not need a calculator or a college degree in mathematics to determine the rating point gain or loss for their chess result(s). Instead of solving a complex linear equation, all they need to do is consult the table below. This "easy-to-use" look-up chart is a graphical representation of the original Kenneth F. Williams (1940) and revised Hotchkiss - Wilcock (1947) linear equations for the rating of correspondence chess players. This statistical sytem, the forerunner of all numeric rating systems, is still utilized by CCLA today and provides unprecedented stability and validity for ratings achieved in CCLA competition. CCLA does not use, and never has used, the "ELO" system; CCLA's system pre-dates "ELO" by 20 years! CCLA will not manipulate players' ratings for political purposes, nor does it statistically "manage" its rating pool.

Class names and 200-point class intervals used by FIDE / ICCF were adopted by the CCLA Board of Directors in 1980.

Rating Classes

 
2200 & up - Master
2000 & 2199 - Expert
1800 & 1999 - Class A
1600 & 1799 - Class B
1400 & 1599 - Class C
1200 & 1399 - Class D
below 1200 - Class E
 

Titles

G = Grandmaster *
I = International Master *
 
* GM and IM titles are conferred by ICCF
 
S = Senior Master 2350 & up +
M = Master 2275 & up +
E = Expert 2100 & up +
 
+ minimum 5 years' membership; these titles
are awarded by CCLA.
 
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Graphic of chess pieces in chaos, © 2003 by Jerry Honn
 
EASY LOOK-UP CHART
 
Col 1 Col 2 Col 3 Col 4
 
Difference Higher Lower  
in rated rated  
Ratings Wins Wins Draw
 
0-19 16 16 0
20-39 15 17 1
40-59 14 18 2
60-79 13 19 3
80-99 12 20 4
100-119 11 21 5
120-139 10 22 6
140-159 9 23 7
160-179 8 24 8
180-199 7 25 9
200-219 6 26 10
220-239 5 27 11
240-259 4 28 12
260-279 3 29 13
280 & up 2 30 14
 

How Rating Points

are Calculated

Rating difference is the difference in ratings at the time the game is concluded, not the players' ratings when the tournament started.

If the higher-rated player wins, he gains the number of points listed in Column 2 and his opponent loses the same.

If the lower-rated player wins, he gains the number of points listed in Column 3 and his opponent loses the same.

If the result is a draw, the lower-rated player gains the number of points listed in Column 4 and the higher-rated player loses the same.

Rating points gained by one player are lost by the other player, always.

 

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